International Student Forum Report

On February 22, I attended the International Student Forum hosted by Professor Lamsal. In this forum, three students from three different backgrounds expressed their experiences of being an international multilingual student at the University of San Francisco. The international students talked about their perspectives on topics such as what were the challenges they encountered, how they were able to adjust to the American culture, and why they chose to come to USF. They also discussed the issues international undergrad and grad students are facing which was very helpful for everyone, including other international students, domestic students, and the professors at USF. The three students gave the audience ways to combat those challenges such as engaging and finding a common ground with the international students and helping them in classes, because for some of the international students it may be a culture shock to come to the United States. I found their experiences and the differences between their country and USF to be intriguing. I enjoy learning and understanding about the different cultures. After the event, I learned that many international students are facing the same challenges and I respond to this by knowing that there are ways we can support the international students academically and culturally at USF.  

February 23, 2018

Patricia, Rocio, Sonja

Plagiarism:

  1. Not plagiarism because it is common knowledge that Obama is the 44th president, but must be cited.
  2. Yes because it is based on the novel and he didn’t use citations.
  3. Not plagiarism because it is his own work, but he must cite his sources.
  4. Yes because if there is doubt in the work then it is probably plagiarism.
  5. Yes if she did not cite her sources.

February 21, 2018

During my early years of high school, there was a time I felt “tokenized” because of my physical appearance. I was smaller than my peers and when people first met me, the assumptions I think they make about me based on my appearance include that I am too small to be athletic or to do any form of physical activity. I felt that I wasn’t allowed to join a sport because I would have been made fun of. Instead, I focused more on co-curricular, community services and my academics and that resulted in high GPAs. I was put in the stereotype of a being nerdy and weak, however, I still wanted to do a sport because I did enjoy working out and going outside. Eventually, I took up the courage to join track and field and be more active, and by my senior year, I didn’t feel small anymore. I was more confident with my physical appearance.

 

February 16, 2018

APA References:

  1. Gebhard, J. G. (2010). What do international students think and feel? Adapting to U. S. college life and culture. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.
  2. (H. Mar, Personal communication. June 30, 2011) not included in the APA reference list
  3. Mack, T. (1997, May). Culture shock.  Forbes, p. 188-90.
  4. Simpson, J. C. (2006, May 8).  Chronicler of culture shock. Time, p. 156. Retrieved from Academic Search Premier.
  5. Wright, R. (2005). Going to teach in prisons: Culture shock. Journal of Correctional Education, 56(1), 19-38. Retrieved from Academic Search Premier.

February 12, 2018

Audio Essay Pitch

My story is about the environment I grew up in and how it is different from San Francisco. My story will begin with my daily life back in my hometown. Talking about what I did in the morning before school. I will talk about what the area looks like where I live, then mention that I live in Hawaii on the Island of Molokai. I will describe what Molokai looks like and how it is full of beautiful beaches. I will also mention facts about the island such as the story of Kalaupapa, how there is only one public high school on the island, and the population is 7000.

My story will also include the activities  I do in my hometown, which is different from the norms done in San Francisco. Some of the activities include dancing hula, working in the taro patches, hunting deer, hiking waterfalls, spearing fish, and body boarding. I will also talk about the popular music we listen to, the different foods we eat, and how we embrace family. This will provide the listeners with a cultural understanding of where I grew up in. Then I will transition my experience of leaving home and coming to San Francisco and how different the environment is. I will conclude with talking about how grateful I am to grow up on Molokai.

February 9, 2018

Free Writing on Essay 1

My audio essay will be about the culture I grew up in. I will talk about living in Hawaii on the island of Molokai. I will include the beach, sound of the waves, talk about where I live, where I grew up, the culture I grew up in, the family traditions. the life on Molokai because it’s a different environment. what I do for fun on Molokai, go to the beach, go hunting, hiking up the falls, camp on the beach. the typical foods we eat on Molokai. beautiful beaches hot sand, perfect water temp, clear blue ocean, plenty of fishes, humuhumunukunukuapua’a fish, ahi, mahi-mahi, turtles, opihi. beautiful shells, crabs running around, waves crashing and breaking on the shore, tide goes in tide goes out. hunting in my backyard or in the forest, green fields with scattered brown dots, those brown dots are deer. hiking up the falls, exotic trees, birds chirping, the roaring of water as it falls down the cliff, the icy cold pool at the bottom

  • Introduction: My audio essay will be about the culture I grew up in. I might start the audio essay with the sounds of nature or waves crashing. Then I will begin by introducing that I live in Hawaii but on the island of Molokai. When I say that I live on Molokai most people don’t know where that is and it has a different environment.
  • Body:
    • Paragraph 1: Introducing Molokai:
      • I will talk a little about Molokai, where it is in Hawaii, the population(7000), and some interesting facts such as how there are only one public high school and two gas stations, no malls or buildings taller than 3 stories high. There is one road that connects one side of the island to the other. You could say that we are isolated and we are, but that’s what makes Molokai so unique and full of rich culture.
    • Paragraph 2: Molokai culture:
      • hula
      • food
      • music
      • land
    • Paragraph 3: What I do for fun on Molokai:
      • Go to the beach
      • Hunting for dears
      • Hiking up the waterfall
  • Conclusion: I will talk about my transition from Molokai to San Francisco

February 7, 2018

Essay 1 Discussion

The main expectations that this assignment has is to create an audio essay that talks about our experiences facing cultural, racial, and language identities. It is also a way to let others learn about our past experiences. Creating an audio essay will strengthen our understanding of digital tools and compare it to written text. The strengths I have about such composing process include being able to edit my audio essay because I have experience in some audio tools and programs. Another strength includes being able to talk about my life and culture because that is something that I am familiar with. The challenges that I may face when creating this audio essay is maintaining the attention of the listeners, finding a particular soundscape that has influenced my life, and being comfortable with listening to my voice. I plan to address these challenges by creating a dramatized structure through my dialogue so listeners are more engaged, dig deeper into my past to find a familiar soundscape that resonates with me, and practice my public speaking skills so that I am more comfortable with my voice. This is the first time I have done an audio essay and I am excited to know how this will enhance my learning.

 

February 5, 2018

Summary of Brandi Chang’s Discussion:

After reading Brandi Chang’s post on the February 5th discussion about Garnette Cadogan’s essay, “Black and Blue”, and “Scenes and Un-Scenes: Class Dismissed,” Chang argues that minorities, such as people of color, are faced with racial discrimination and stereotyping when living in the United States, and that the topic of social class is not widely discussed.  After realizing how recent these essays have been written, she realizes that the United States is too stubborn to accept diversity.  She states that about a year ago, more light has come through about this type of injustice and I agree with her that more needs to be done to stop this type of racial profiling. I agree with her statement that there are people in the U.S. still being treated less than others. In addition, she also argues that the U.S. doesn’t bring up the topic of social class and other pressing issues because we are more focused on entertainment and consumerism.

January 29, 2018

Natalie Turgeman, Brandi Chang, Sonja Angst

Status of transgender people in the U.S.

Someone who is transgender identifies as a gender other than the one they were born with. Usually, people hear, “It’s a boy!” or “It’s a girl!” because deciding gender or sex is based on anatomy. Even though people have misconceptions that the transgender community is based on surgery, sexual orientation, or the way they dress; in reality, it is all about how someone feels on the inside. According to webmd.com, “The Williams Institute says there are nearly 700,000 people living publicly as transgender in the U.S. Each one is unique, and their journeys are personal.” Some people identify as the opposite sex, whereas others may feel that they signify both or neither.

According to the Human Rights Campaign, the issues that transgender people face within society include severe discrimination, stigma, and systematic inequality. Because of discrimination, the transgender community faces challenges such as lack of legal protection, poverty, harassment, barriers to healthcare, and lack of identity documents. The Human Rights Campaign states that “only 18 states and the District of Columbia prohibit employment and housing discrimination based on gender identity” and 15% of the transgender community are in severe poverty. 34% of them are Black and 28% of them are Latina/o. In addition, the lack of accurate identification documents means a limit to travel, education, and access to many services that are essential for people to function in society.

Something that is crucial for the transgender community to thrive and gain more support is visibility, meaning more positive images need to be put out into the media and society. Even with this type of positive exposure of the transgender community, it isn’t enough for more change to be made to help more people accept them as equals. To support each other and the community in general, people have created various groups within their communities that transgender people can join for support, social needs as well as to help out other people in the LGBTQQ community. Groups such as The Human Rights Campaign, TransGender San Francisco, The SF LGBT Center and so on all strive to be there for transgender people in order to provide them places where they can be accepted and continue to strive for change.

 

Bibliography

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/transgender

https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/features/transgender-what-it-means

https://www.hrc.org/resources/understanding-the-transgender-community

http://www.sfcenter.org/resources/trans

http://tgsf.org/