Program

See conference booklet

presentations

Title Presenter(s) University
A Nomadic Research Journey: Blogging with an iPad and taking a critical posthumanism perspective Veronica Mitchell University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa
Appy Hour: Building a Faculty Professional Development Tablet Workshop Tracy Stuntz California State University, Fresno, USA
Collaborative Game-Based Learning with iPads and External Keyboards in a Web Development Class Aekaterini Mavri, Fernando Loizides, and Nicos Souleles Cyprus University of Technology, Limassol, Cyprus. 
Converging Lines: Apple’s iPad and Active Learning in Higher Education Neil Glen Bath School of Art and Design, Bath Spa University, Bath, UK
CSU Fresno: DiscoverE Program Mike Pronovost California State University, Fresno, USA
Enhancing Fieldwork Learning using an eBook Judith Lock University of Southampton, Southampton, UK
Everyday student use of iPads: a vade mecum for students’ active learning W. Brian Whalley University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK
Integrating iPads and Mobile Learning Technologies in Executive MBA Student Services Kristen Dittus and Jode Hamilton University of San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA
iPad Apps for Collaboration in Higher Education 2016 Rebecca Loboschefsky and Rochelle Fong Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
iPads in Art and Design Higher Education: A Survey of Practices and Challenges Nicos Souleles Cyprus University of Technology, Limassol, Cyprus
Law Student Learning, Storytelling and Student Device Initiatives Michael Blissenden Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia
Launch of the Digital World at Maryville University Mark LombardiJennifer L. McCluskey, and Dustin R. Loeffler Maryville University, St. Louis, Missouri, USA
Mobile Learning Institute: A Faculty Professional Development Initiative Michael Truong and Tim Schreffler Azusa Pacific University, Azusa, California, USA
Redefining Learning Using a Common Mobile Platform: One University’s Journey through Initial Implementation Victoria M. Cardullo Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, USA
PhraseBot Language-learning App for Multi-word Units Oliver Rose Kwansei Gakuin University, Japan
The Multidisciplinary Application of Mobile Learning with iPads: A Comparison of Approaches for Enhancement Fiona Harvey and Mary Morrison  University of Southampton, Southampton. UK
The Scale of the Challenge; Staff vs. Student Perspectives of iPads in Higher Education Alice Shepherd Leeds University Business School, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
The End of the Term Paper? Oliver Hadingham Rikkyo University, Tokyo, Japan
The Nature of the eBook on the Mobile Device as a Tool for Developing and Promoting Interactive Learning. Paul Hopkins and Kevin Burden The University of Hull, UK
The Use of iPads in Teacher Education Kevin Burden and Paul Hopkins The University of Hull, UK
Towards Designing a Portable Online Assessment System Abdel-Karim Al-Tamimi Yarmouk University, Irbid, Jordan
Using iPads for Teaching Future Educators to Integrate iPad Use in the Classroom Claudia McVicker William Jewell College, Liberty, Missouri, USA
Use of iPads to Support Group Work in the Classroom  James Bowers and Poonam Kumar University Center, Michigan, USA
Varying Perspectives: iPad Deployments at the University of San Diego Shahra MeshkatyJerome AmmerBradley Bond, and Cyd Burrows University of San Diego, California, USA

 

Vendor Presentations Speaker
Doceri Stephen Thomas and Paul Brown, Doceri
Explain Everything: ‘Explain Everything: Create, Collaborate, Share & Discover Samuel George and Kuba Mastalerz, Explain Everything
Introduction to the iPad Pro – The Next Platform for Learning TBA
Padlet: Collaboration in the Classroom with Padlet Melanie Broder, Padlet
Poll Everywhere Dani Arama, Poll Everywhere

 

Session Descriptions

The end of the paper term paper?

Do college students prefer electronic feedback via annotation software apps to paper and pen feedback? The potential of certain Web 2.0 technologies to providemore meaningful, collaborative, and interconnected learning is well known. Annotation software applications are one such Web 2.0 technology. Such apps have huge potential to improve the learning experience for today’s students by: delivering faster more portable feedback to students offering a clearer, more interactive feedback that more fully engages the student with the instructor’s comments through text boxes, pop-up comments, colour coding, and audio and visual feedback.

 

Redefining Learning Using a Common Mobile Platform: One University’s Journey through Initial Implementation

This presentation will explore findings from a yearlong study that implemented a common mobile platform using iPads. The research setting afforded a glimpse at the differences between two unique classrooms: a large lecture hall and a learning community classroom. During this session, we will share research collected related to: productivity, classroom management, classroom design, content integration using technology, and the need for faculty and student professional development. We will position these findings in relation to two theoretical frameworks for coding: Substitution, Augmentation, Modification, and Redefinition (SAMR, Puentedura, 2006); and Bloom’s Taxonomy (Bloom et al., 1956). The intent of the paper is to provide evidence from our research conducted to examine, analyze, and extract information of lessons learned throughout the yearlong research feasibility study.

 

PhraseBot Language-learning App for Multi-word Units

PhraseBot is a puzzle game to actively learn any kinds of words, phrases or sentences! Connect word/letter tiles to make the answer for the given clue, earning points and clearing stages in various game modes for different levels of difficulty and kind of skill.

Launch of the Digital World at Maryville University

Maryville University began the launch of Digital World soon after key leadership from campus president, vice president, and faculty – visited Cupertino, CA in May 2014 and heard from Dr. Kevin Ross, Chris Boniforti, and Dr. Gregg Cox from Lynn University. Our workshop will be a panel discussion from key leadership for other institutions considering a university-wide launch of the iPad. The panel would include Maryville University president, Dr. Mark Lombardi, as well as Dustin Loeffler, Apple Distinguished Educator and Maryville University Director of Graduate Programs. We would address necessary components for not only a successful launch, but a revolutionary change in student learning. In December 2014 Maryville University deployed more than 150 iPads to all full time faculty and adjunct faculty who would be part of our pilot in Fall 2015. Significant professional development for faculty included four cohorts led by Apple certified faculty/staff throughout the Spring 2015 semester. Professional development for faculty has been instrumental to the successful launch and has included a university wide commitment to the effort. Maryville continues this professional development effort and by the end of Spring 2016 more than 85% of our full time faculty will be trained on the use of the iPad for student learning. Throughout the spring and summer months we deployed iPads to all first-year students during the pre-orientation and registration events to better connect with them during the summer, prepare them for active usage of the device in the classrooms this fall, and further connect them with our institution.

 

‘Appy hour: Building a faculty professional development tablet workshop

Based on faculty feedback, our Instructional Design team is working to create a series of workshops for faculty who teach in our tablet program. These workshops will each focus on a theme, and different faculty and staff will be invited to present on the applications they use that fit the theme for that workshop. Our tablet program currently serves 5000 students, and over 100 faculty are participating. The faculty have previously participated in a semester-long cohort, and a week-long summer institute to learn how to use their tablets and develop their courses. These workshops are so faculty can continue to learn about new applications or become experts in the applications they currently use.

 

The nature of the eBook on the mobile device as a tool for developing and promoting interactive learning.

The advent of the true eBook, situated on and integrated with the powerful tablet device of the iPad, has changed the pedagogic landscape for teaching and learning. This paper explores how eBooks are being developed not just as resource, but as powerful pedagogic tools which offer opportunities for interactive teaching and learning. Working with students who are training to be teachers the eBook offers an opportunity for them to consider the pedagogical disruptive nature of the eBook / iPad combination (Royle, Stager and Traxler, 2014) as part of their own course and as a model for the teaching they will undertake on teaching practice and when they graduate as beginning teachers. Working with students at the University of Hull as a part of a wider European project the authors are developing both a conceptual framework building on the nature of interactivity (Hargreaves et al, 2003), and exemplars of good practice.

 

 

iPad Apps for Collaboration in Higher Education 2016

This workshop focuses on exposing educators to creative, innovative and engaging iPad applications, learning how to get the most from these apps in collaborating with one another. iPads are consumer products of technology and are generally designed to be used by an individual and not by teams of educators or students. It’s up to us to instruct through technology in ways that we can best deploy project-based learning in fostering teamwork, self-exploration, a mutual exploration of ideas, and a collaborative supportive approach to academic work while providing a digital space for professional growth and development.

 

iPads in Art and Design Higher Education: A survey of practices and challenges

The objective of this study is to unpack through a survey of academics in Art and Design, general trends and uses of the iPad for teaching and learning. Data was collected through an online questionnaire consisting of a mixture of open and closed questions. The survey was circulated to a dedicated online forum most of whose members teach in Art and Design. There are unique teaching and learning practices that are distinctive to the sector and these inform the educational context for the use of iPads. Although one limitation of this investigation is that the sample – those who replied to the survey – is relatively small, a number of inferences are possible, and they point towards small-scale implementations with some promising potential in terms of teaching and learning strategies. However, a number of challenges were identified such as the cost of the tablet and the perceived lack of appropriate apps for some of the disciplines, and to some extent these hinder the wider adoption of the tablet for teaching and learning in the sector. It is suggested that the current small-scale implementations are used on conjunction with action research, to evaluate in a more systematic manner the benefits and inform related professional development and wider iPad implementations in Art and Design.

 

Using iPads for Teaching Future Educators to Integrate iPad Use in the Classroom

Come learn how pre-service teachers write their own literacy autobiography iBooks to understand the recursive nature of reading and writing. Discover new iPAD applications and technology as instructional tools for teaching children in the elementary schools. Come participate in a multimedia session and practice proven hands-on techniques to integrate iPad Apps in the classroom. The discussion and applications will be appropriate and can be applied for all disciplines. Participants will leave with strategies and resources to help improve instructional literacy practices for higher education teaching as well as elementary schools. This session will be delivered using a vibrant mulitmedia presentation via an iBook with embedded videos, audio clips, digital photographs and actual iBook Autobiographies written by pre-service teachers. Additionally, links to online resources will include my syllabus, directions on authoring an iBook in iBook Author, reflection prompts for pre-service teachers and practicing teachers directions on the digital artifact collection to be completed for the iBook Autobiography, an iBook template for the teacher’s and a child’s iBook, and an app suggestion for children to create an iBook Autobiography. Finally, the session will end with a question and answer and participant discussion time. This collaboration will allow each group to briefly network to exchange ideas and contact information for resource sharing.

 

Varying Perspectives: iPad Deployments at the University of San Diego

The University of San Diego has been actively involved in studying the pedagogical benefits of mobile devices in teaching and learning through the deployment of iPads in the classroom since the spring semester of 2012. This paper examines varying perspectives on this project. Academic Technology Services (ATS) created a visionary initiative involving faculty development and logistical deployment strategies to get devices into the hands of the students and faculty members involved. The learning outcomes, lessons learned, and constantly evolving technologies continue to shape this initiative with each deployment. Pain points and success stories are discussed. Detailed processes and procedures, and an in-depth working knowledge of the community needs help the department to research, identify and support innovative uses of specific apps, and integration into curriculum. Faculty members offer perspectives from their participatory experiences in the program. iPads adopted in a special education methods course in the School of Eduation and Leadership Sciences incorporated e-textbooks, Blackboard Mobile Learn, digital reflective journaling, and collaborative team work. Dr. Jerome Ammer discusses the study outcomes and research questions of those courses. In a communication studies course, Children and Media, Dr. Bradley Bond’s students were required to incorporate the use of iPads into their work tutoring children in after school programs. Video blogs replaced the traditional written weekly reflections that were done in the past, requiring students to become comfortable speaking about complex concepts and theories and articulating their thoughts. General outcomes and unanticipated lessons learned from other projects involving a wide array of academic disciplines are highlighted herein.

 

Use of iPads to Support Group Work in the Classroom

Although iPads and hand held devices have become ubiquitous and have the potential for enhancing student learning in the classroom, very few studies have looked at the impact of using iPads in classroom on student engagement and learning. iPads, can be powerful teaching and learning tools if they are thoughtfully incorporated in the instruction to engage students in active learning activities. This presentation will share the results of an exploratory study designed to examine the effectiveness of incorporating iPads in the classroom to support group work. The purpose of this study is to answer two main research questions. First, is there a difference between students’ retention and learning of the material when iPads are used for group work versus the normal pen/paper method? Second, is there a difference in student satisfaction and engagement when iPads are incorporated for group work in a course? A comparative analysis will be done between two sections of the same undergraduate course, taught by the same instructor. One section will use iPads for group work and apart from that all learning activities and assignments are same. A variety of measures are being used to collect data: quizzes, exams, discussion board postings, performance on group activities and analytics from the LMS. In addition, at the end of the courses students will also fill out a survey about satisfaction and perceptions of engagement. The results of the study will enhance our understanding of using iPads as a teaching/learning tool and serve as a pilot to facilitate broader discussions at the institution for integrating iPads in the classroom.

 

Towards Designing a Portable Online Assessment System

Tablet devices, iPads in particular, have paved the way to new means of interactive online e-learning and assessment opportunities, especially in higher education. The ubiquitousness of tablet devices, in particular among younger generations, stresses the promising potentials of the available tablet-based systems to flourish in higher education for the coming generations. While the availability and the affordability of tablet devices have come a long way in the recent years, there is still a dire need for affordable and portable online assessment systems, especially in developing countries where providing a supporting infrastructure for tens and hundreds of tablet devices can be an issue. In this paper, we present our portable wireless assessment system that can provide instructors with the ability to conduct exams and quizzes in their classes and on the move. The system design focuses on providing high levels of usability, portability, reliability, security and scalability. We have evaluated our system design and implementation with the help of more than 25 instructors and 40 students. Our proposed system provides an affordable solution to performing online assessments and helps improve the interactivity between instructors and students.

 

Converging Lines: Apple’s iPad and Active Learning in Higher Education.

This paper investigates ways in which convergent devices such as Apple’s iPad can enhance active learning in a higher education setting. The iPad, with an ever-growing availability of educational apps, is often talked of as a new technology for learning. The personal nature and portability makes creating and presenting multimedia material through innovative platforms such as Prezi and Explain Everything simple. Both innovative and disruptive, the iPad acts as a convergent device, recording, editing and broadcasting a range of media, linking these technologies to enable new actions and opportunities, suggesting an opportunity to develop alternative structures in learning. Working in-depth with a lecturer and students, we used observation and interview techniques to gain insight to this agent’s effectiveness at creating a new dynamic for teaching in a workshop environment and whether student familiarity with social media and mobile devices would help them to engage as co-authors of their learning experience if presented with the opportunity. The positive responses of the lecturer and students from this case study warrant further research.

 

Collaborative Game-Based Learning with iPads and External Keyboards in a Web Development Class

Although iPads and hand held devices have become ubiquitous and have the potential for enhancing student learning in the classroom, very few studies have looked at the impact of using iPads in classroom on student engagement and learning. iPads can be powerful teaching and learning tools if they are thoughtfully incorporated in the instruction to engage students in active learning activities. This paper will share the results of an exploratory study designed to examine the effectiveness of incorporating iPads in the classroom to support group work. The purpose of this study was to answer two main research questions. First, is there a difference between students’ retention and learning of the material when iPads are used for group work versus the normal pen/paper method? Second, what is student satisfaction and engagement when iPads are incorporated for group work in a course? A comparative analysis was done between two sections of the same undergraduate course, taught by the same instructor. One section used iPads for group work and apart from that all learning activities and assignments were same. A variety of measures were used to collect data: quizzes, exams, discussion work, and performance on group activities. In addition, at the end of the semester students completed a survey about satisfaction and perceptions of engagement. Students in the iPad group discussion scored significantly higher on 2 of 3 quizzes designed to measure student retention. Students also scored significantly higher with the averaged quiz scores. Students reported satisfaction with using the iPad in the classroom group activities. The results of the study will enhance our understanding of using iPads as a teaching/learning tool and serve as a pilot to facilitate broader discussions at the institution level for integrating iPads in the classroom.

 

A Nomadic Research Journey: Blogging with an iPad and taking a critical posthumanism perspective

The iPad has the power to transform educational practices. Most research to date has investigated the instructional potential of the touchpad and the collective influence it has for shifting teaching and learning practices. This paper explains a personal journey of an iPad-with-researcher traveling an unknown path through blogging. Using concepts related to posthumanism such as new materialism, the forces and intensities of the iPad inspire a diffractive approach that moves beyond traditional research reflexivity. The author creates images from and with a variety of iPad Apps to open pathways that facilitate engagement with theoretical concepts. Deleuze and Guattari’s rhizomatic thinking illustrates the multidimensionality and openness that maps and promotes meaning-making in the context of a doctoral research project based in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University of Cape Town. This study was triggered by students sharing their narratives about witnessing abuse, neglect and disrespect in South Africa’s over-stretched public health birthing facilities. The objective of the project is to develop a socially just pedagogy that can enable medical students to be advocates for change thereby contributing to the attainment of quality healthcare for all.

 

The Scale of the Challenge; Staff vs. Student Perspectives of iPads in Higher Education

This paper compares student and staff perspectives on a large iPad deployment for taught postgraduate students in the Faculty of Business of a large UK research-intensive university. Existing literature on iPads in Higher Education (HE) suggests that there are differences in how staff and students perceive the impact of iPads on their teaching and learning respectively, but there is little evidence to support this indication because most studies focus on either the staff or student perspective, not both. Our study builds on prior work within the faculty and the institution, including an iPad pilot with all years of undergraduate students in the Faculty of Biological Sciences (Morris et. al, 2012), the findings of which suggested that the device had academic use potential, but that students tended to focus on a small range of core uses. We adopted both qualitative and quantitative research approaches to the evaluation of our project, conducting online surveys of academic teaching staff and students towards the end of the teaching period (Spring 2015) followed by focus groups. In this paper, we report on the survey results. We asked similar questions of both groups to facilitate comparison, and aligned questions to the SAMR (substitution, augmentation, modification and redefinition) model categories (Puentedura, 2006). Our results echo existing literature in some respects: students and staff tended to make frequent use of a relatively narrow range of functionality, primarily in the S and A categories of the SAMR model. However, students engaged more with their iPad and were more positive about the impact of it on their learning experience than other studies have suggested, perhaps because a large number of our students had used a tablet previously and they were given not loaned the iPad for their whole programme, making an investment in learning the technology worthwhile. The comparison of staff and student perspectives confirms and expands on a significant gap in perceptions. This study contributes to the development of an evidence base on this issue. We conclude by offering suggestions on how this gap might be bridged, which is one of the long-term objectives of our iPad project.

 

Everyday student use of iPads: a vade mecum for students’ active learning

The iPad has evolved into a very capable computer with high processor power, enhanced screen resolution and good battery life. However, this capability is still largely untapped in higher education by students or staff. Despite promoting ‘imagination in a world of constant change’ (Thomas and Brown 2011), the revolutionising of higher education by ‘Web 2.0 and Millennials’ (McHaney 2011) and the knowledge of ‘how people learn’ (Bransford et al. 2000) there is still reliance on a ‘Victorian’ educational system. That is, content delivery by lectures and assessment by examination. Massive Online Open Courses (MOOC) are, mostly, a modernisation of such content delivery. However, ‘active learning’, coupled with increased availability of ‘Cloud’ services and iPads/smartphones, provides opportunities for students to use practical mobile devices ‘anywhere’. Such ubiquity allows tutors to promote active learning in any location, even in the lecture theatre. We examine some of the pedagogy behind this trend and suggest ways in which students’ educational experiences are enhanced via active learning with iPads etc, whether ‘cloud-linked’ or not. Survey results from a range of UK universities doing fieldwork in the UK and abroad show the uses to which iPads are being used. We extend this to consider how active pedagogies can use iPads in any location. Involved active learning accommodates the need for inclusion of digital, information and literacy skills into the curriculum as well as integrating a knowledge bases via an ‘Internet of Everything’. Moreover, employability skills can be incorporated into the learning experiences and the personalisation of iPads can accommodate the needs of students with mobility and specific difficulties. These educational interventions fit in with Hattie and Yates’ ‘Visible Learning’ (2014) and are closely allied to practical engagement via individual, peer and group-based problem solving approaches. Our survey examines Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) in fieldwork and suggests why tutors are reluctance to use iPads. This will diminish as students become empowered to use ‘smart-cloud’ technologies to promote their educational needs. The iPad and kin can be thought of as a vade mecum, enhancing everyone’s learning in a ‘fourth dimension’ (Scott 2015).

 

Mobile Learning Institute: A Faculty Professional Development Initiative

The Mobile Learning Institute is a year-long faculty professional development initiative, co-sponsored by a center for teaching and learning and an academic unit at a medium-size, private school in Southern California. This pilot initiative provided a select group of faculty members, including new and senior faculty and program chairs and directors, an opportunity to explore the use of iPads and educational apps and their academic benefits. The institute’s three primary objectives include: 1) Helping participants gain confidence in operating their iPads; 2) Educating participants about different mobile learning examples and opportunities; and 3) Equipping participants to become content creators, not just consumers. This institute represents a strategic and sustainable movement toward wider adoption and utilization of iPads at the university.

 

Redefining Learning Using a Common Mobile Platform: One University’s Journey through Initial Implementation 

This presentation will explore findings from a yearlong study that implemented a common mobile platform using iPads. The research setting afforded a glimpse at the differences between two unique classrooms: a large lecture hall and a learning community classroom. During this session, we will share research collected related to: productivity, classroom management, classroom design, content integration using technology, and the need for faculty and student professional development. We will position these findings in relation to two theoretical frameworks for coding: Substitution, Augmentation, Modification, and Redefinition (SAMR, Puentedura, 2006); and Bloom’s Taxonomy (Bloom et al., 1956). The intent of the paper is to provide evidence from our research conducted to examine, analyze, and extract information of lessons learned throughout the yearlong research feasibility study.

 

The multidisciplinary application of mobile learning with ipads: A comparison of approaches for enhancement

For the last three years the University of Southampton, through the Institute for Learning Innovation and Development have been working with students as partners in developing the digital literacies skills of both staff and students. An integral part of the approach has been the use of iPads to support this development. Students working with academics across a range of disciplines have been issued with ipads to support the exploration of a variety of digital applications including ebooks, apps, interactive video, blogs, the use of twitter for language learning and more. The initiative is part of the Southampton Opportunity project at the University and the Innovation and Digital Literacies Champions are one group of students who are specifically involved in supporting technology enhanced learning. In addition, Fiona Harvey, lead for the iChamps initative (Institute for Learning Innovation and Development) and Dr Mary Morrison (Southampton Business School) have been monitoring how the MBA programme has utilized and learnt from their own experiences in using iPads as an official part of their programme. The University does not have an official policy for the use of iPads across the institution but iPads are the mobile tablet of choice amongst most academic staff. Students have their own devices but have lately tended to bring with them laptops and mobile phones. The iChamps have all reported how they have not only been able to demonstrate ideas with their academic leads but that they have also improved their own productivity. Some had other tablets but prefer the ease of use of the ipad over their alternatives. This paper will compare the impact of the use of ipads within the formal supported MBA programme of the Business School with the cross-institutional use of iPads by the students and staff from a range of disciplines, including Health Sciences, Modern Languages, Chemistry and History. It will examine how informal use of these tools has enhanced the design of the modules or projects and reflect on if formalizing the use of iPads has made any significant difference to student satisfaction and achievement. The research will inform future strategic plans for education enhancement at the University.

 

Window on the World: iPads and Augmented Reality for Richer Readings

IPads are potentially the optimum instructional device for enriching reading through collating references, support materials and creating videos to construct augmented reality presentations. Augmented reality applications, including QR coding and video streaming, through the apps Aurasma and Zapper, provide exciting opportunities to bring reading alive. Using iPads and augmented reality in the classroom, transforms reading into digitalised phenomena. Presentations are linked to texts’ content, concepts and key lexis to help students to unpack meaning and access cultural and contextual schema. This greater comprehension also improves students’ confidence and ability to analyse, evaluate and critique. The ‘Window on the World’ or ‘WoW’ approach to reading, using iPads and augmented reality, also adapts Tyson’s (2015) academic reading circles (ARC) approach to assign students specific roles for text exploration. The ‘WoW’ method uses the reading circle ‘lenses’ to take students on a graphic journey enabling them to become the navigators of their research to ensure deep level readings and synthesis. This teaching and learning cycle facilitates the deconstruction of texts in terms of vocabulary awareness; contextual, social and historical references; visual and graphic resources. WoW! Window on the World: iPads and Augmented Reality for Richer Readings WoW reading is iPad pedagogy that goes beyond traditional approaches to teaching reading by offering an innovative presentation of resources and student responses. This paper discusses how iPads and augmented reality are versatile tools with the potential to transform the reading classroom into a 21st Century learning platform of collaboration, higher-order and critical thinking.

 

Enhancing Fieldwork Learning using an eBook

Alumni often cite undergraduate field courses as the most enjoyable aspect of their degree course. I worked with a BSc (Hons) Biology undergraduate student iChamp partner, Charlie Cosstick, to use iBook to produce an eBook as the course handbook for a first year ecology field course. The 12 day field course takes place in Southern Spain and is compulsory for all Biology, Ecology and Zoology students in the Centre for Biological Sciences at the University of Southampton. We take along with us 20 departmental iPads, which are used to produce species identification notebooks of plants and invertebrates in Evernote and have rugged cases to allow them to be used in the field. In addition to the 20 departmental iPads, a growing number of students take their own tablets and smartphones. To engage students with learning prior to the field course we have produced an eBook. Field course students are able to engage in active learning in advance of the trip, simulating many activities which they may not have had previous experience of due to the reduction of field work learning in schools. Rather than simply producing an iBook version of the printed handbook, we enhanced the content of the book, providing links to websites, youtube films made by previous students on the field course and specially-created GIFs that allow student to learn at their own individual pace before and during the field trip. Students can also comment on sections of the eBook, collecting data, sharing their knowledge with others and assisting with further development of the eBook. Use of gamification simulations of biological laboratory techniques has been proven to improve student perceptions of laboratory exercises by increasing student engagement and motivation. We aim to provide similar enhancement to fieldwork learning. Preparatory work will also remove possible anxiety due to lack of previous fieldwork experience and the intensity of the course, also improving student perceptions of the course.

 

Law Student Learning, Storytelling and Student Device Initiatives

The use of stories in the teaching of law is increasing and is now widely reported in the literature. (Judith Moran: Families, Law, and Literature: The story of a course on storytelling (2015) 49 USFL Rev 1). The author in that article suggests: “An approach to teaching law students how to tell stories effectively, whether they are advocating in a courtroom or a policy-making arena. This teaching method incorporates close reading and reflective writing techniques — skills that enable students to critically examine the specific narrative elements that comprise a story: plot, timeframe, setting, character, and point of view.” Furthermore it is commented that: “It is axiomatic that the best method of teaching is not simply didactic instruction; rather it is to create an awakening and moving experience for the students so that the content has meaning to them. Accordingly, the methods of teaching law students about the power of storytelling should be integrated into the legal-writing curriculum in ways that may draw students into the process.” One of the ways in which teaching can be highlighted for law students is to utilise the use of technology and, in particular, the use of iPads to create this narrative and stories. This paper will examine the interplay between the uses of iPads to facilitate classroom activities for students to create narratives to reflect on the manner in which the law operates in an Australian context. The paper will draw upon work that the author has already published in relation to iPads. The paper will report on the way in which the technological apps can be utilised in the law classroom to embrace storytelling, to create narrative and to provide real opportunities for students for learning and to embrace best teaching pedagogy. An Australian law unit will be showcased as an example of how to utilise iPads within a storytelling methodology. A reflection will be provided as to the processes involved and illustrate how the interplay can work to improve learning and teaching.

 

The Use of iPads in Teacher Education

A recognised and critical function of university education departments around the world is the preparation and training of teachers. If we accept there are a growing number of teachers using tablet technologies like the iPad in their teaching and learning it follows that there is an urgent need to ensure those teachers entering the workforce (pre-service teachers) are well supported in their use and conceptualisations of these emerging technologies. This includes not just simply the practical use of these applications, important though that is, but also the pedagogical underpinning and the ways in which mobile devices are challenging existing pedagogical models. Despite growing interest in the use of tablet devices in teacher education (see Baran, 2014) there is little to suggest university educators have fully recognised the opportunities or indeed the challenges inherent in the affordances of these technologies, particularly in terms of how they ‘disrupt’ existing paradigms of teacher preparation (Royle, Stager and Traxler, 2014). The Mobile Technologies Transforming Teacher Educator’s Pedagogies project (MTTEP, www.mttep.eu) is a European funded project which seeks to address this issue by developing a mobile learning network for teacher educators in order to support them in their use and transformational application of these technologies. Over the course of three years (2014-2017) the project will develop a mobile learning toolkit to support educators in evaluating their current practice with mobile technologies with a view to designing more effective mobile learning scenarios which exploit their unique pedagogical affordances, or ‘signature pedagogies’. Theoretically the project is underpinned by the mobile learning framework developed by researchers in Australia and the UK based on the pedagogical constructs of collaboration, authenticity and personalisation which are identified as the unique signature pedagogies of mobile learning (Kearney, Schuck, Burden and Aubusson, 2012):

  • Collaboration – supporting conversations and the exchange of data
  • Authenticity – using realistic tasks, professional tools and situating the learning in authentic spaces
  • Personalisation – using mobile technologies to give learners more choice and autonomy and to customise their learning experiences

The project is concerned to address the following broad questions that relate to the use of mobile technologies in teacher education and Higher Education:

  1. How are mobile technologies like the iPad challenging the existing pedagogical landscape and ecology of schooling?
  2. What are the implications for this in terms of challenging existing pedagogic frameworks and models?
  3. What are the implications for this for those in teacher education in universities as they prepare teachers for this changing world?

We would like to offer a workshop and/or symposium at the iPadinHE conference for all of those engaged in and supporting teacher education and continuing professional development for teachers/lecturers to explore the following three questions:

  1. How are iPads currently being used in teacher education?
  2. How are these challenging and impacting on pedagogic models?
  3. What are the implications for teacher education?

We would invite any delegates who are engaged in teacher education to be involved with this workshop and to join a growing network of teacher educators who are involved and engaged with the use of mobile technologies in teacher education. The workshop (2.5 hours) will provide opportunities for delegates to explore the changing face of teacher education with iPads and will include a range of interactive, dynamic activities to engage them in discourse around the questions highlighted above. These will include:

  • An opportunity to explore a variety of scenario planning tools emerging from the MTTEP project that support educators in considering how to design effective learning episodes with mobile devices.
  • An opportunity to use the mobile learning survey and evaluation tool that enables educators to identify how they, and their students, are currently using iPads in their teaching and learning.
  • An examination of various video vignette case studies that explain how university students (teacher education) are using iPads to transform their practice include the use of these devices to construct original knowledge through the production of eBooks.

CSU Fresno: DiscoverE Program

In Fall 2014, Fresno State launched the most innovative technology initiative in the history of the campus, DISCOVERe. DISCOVERe is a mobile technology initiative at the core of President Joseph I. Castro’s bold vision of finding new ways to teach that will engage and challenge students to improve their success in the classroom. It’s an aggressive initiative to break down the digital divide and rethink educating tomorrow’s leaders. In this session we will be discussing how DISCOVERe changed technology, support, and engagement across the entire campus including the partnerships and collaborative efforts we had with both the library and the surrounding community beyond the campus. We are proud to share some of the astounding results of this completely voluntary program, including our lessons learned as we prepare to expand the mobile program to an additional 10,000 students in Fall 2016.

 

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