New Materials From March 2024

The image shows a collage of five book covers from the March 2024 New Materials list at Zief Law Library.
Collage of book covers from the March 2024 New Materials list at Zief Law Library.

The Zief Law Library added new titles to its collection in March 2024. Topics from March include: artificial intelligence; legal education; student wellness; intellectual property; reparations; and global politics. Click the titles below or explore our monthly New Materials at Zief Law Library webpage for the complete list of recent arrivals. 

February 2024 New Materials

The image shows a collage of two book covers from the February 2024 New Materials list at Zief Law Library.
The two new titles added to Zief Law Library’s collection in February 2024.

The Zief Law Library added new materials to its collection in February 2024. Topics from February include intellectual property and internet law. Click the titles below or explore our monthly New Materials at Zief Law Library webpage for the complete list of recent arrivals. 

Welcoming Zief’s New Research Librarian

Zief Law Library is pleased to introduce you to its newest team member, Tim Sanzi. Tim joined us as a Research Librarian and Assistant Professor of Law. He earned his JD from Roger Williams University School of Law in Rhode Island in 2023, where he was the recipient of a Presidential Scholarship and received recognition for providing pro bono legal services. Tim demonstrated an interest in the library profession as an undergraduate and during law school, and completed an archival internship at Trinity College, University of Dublin, Ireland.

Throughout law school, Tim gained legal experience in a variety of positions, including: intern at the U.S. Air Force, Judge Advocate General’s Corps Joint Base Andrews, Maryland; Rule 9 Student Attorney for the Rhode Island Office of the Attorney General; Rhode Island Sea Grant Law Fellow with the Marine Affairs Institute; and judicial intern for the Honorable Brian P. Stern, Associate Justice of the Rhode Island Superior Court.

In his free time, Tim is an avid longboard surfer, road race runner, and hiker.

We’re excited to have Tim join our team of research librarians! Please stop by to say hello next time you’re in the library – you’ll find him in Z103.

 

 

January 2024 New Materials

The image shows a collage of eight book covers from the January 2024 New Materials list at Zief Law Library.
Collage of book covers from the January 2024 New Materials list at Zief Law Library.

The Zief Law Library added new materials to its collection in January 2024. Topics from January include: corporations; criminal law; estate planning; finance; health law; law enforcement; mental health; privacy (data privacy); and technology. Click the titles below or explore our monthly New Materials at Zief Law Library webpage for the complete list of recent arrivals. 

Navigating the Library Catalog

library card cataloglibrary card catalog

As research and writing assignment deadlines inch closer, you may be interested in exploring the print and digital materials the library offers. This week, learn to locate and request resources from the Zief Law Library collection or request an InterLibrary Loan (ILL) to borrow materials from other libraries! This post is meant to help you get familiar with the catalog. This is not a supplement to research advice from Zief librarians.

Getting Started

First, sign into the Ignacio catalog using your USF student ID and password. Access to the catalog is available on the Zief Law Library’ and the Gleeson Library homepages.

 

Ignacio Catalog homepage

If you’re not quite sure what you are looking for but have a general sense of the topic you’re interested in, a keyword search can get you started. Select “Keyword” in the left drop-down menu and type in the keywords that describe your topic. For example, searching “Criminal Procedure” will result in a list of digital and print materials related to criminal procedure. Scroll through the results and take note of the materials that catch your attention. You can also search by title, author, subject, or call number by making the appropriate selection in the drop-down menu.

Note: If you see a work you would like to borrow listed under “Gleeson Stacks,” don’t panic! As a student at the University of San Francisco School of Law, you are allowed to access to Gleeson Library’s collection.

Advanced Search

If you aren’t finding what you are looking for or have a specific book in mind, try Advanced Search! Select “Advanced Search” underneath the search bar.

Use the left-hand drop-down menus to search specific fields, such as keyword, author, title, etc. Then, review the “Search Tips” link underneath the search bars. This page will explain how to format your search for more precise results.

List of search tips from the site

Search and Sort

Choose to sort your results by relevance, date, or title.

Location

You can narrow your search by selecting their location within the library, including, “Law Open Reserve,” “Law Course Reserve,” etc.

Material type

Choose ANY if you do not have a preference, or choose from the list provided, including, E-book, Streaming Video, E-journal, Printed Material, Videos, Archival & MS, etc.

Looking for a digital course text or study guide?

You can find study aids and some required texts on Aspen Learning Library and Lexis Digital Library, located under “Featured Databases” on Zief’s A to Z list of databases. Sign in with your USF ID and password to begin searching!

Language

The drop-down menu offers English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Chinese, Japanese, Latin, Russian, or Hebrew. If you don’t see material in a language you need, contact a librarian!

Publisher and Publishing Date

If you know the publisher or publishing date you are looking for, enter the text in the appropriate search bars at the bottom of the page.

Completing Your Search

In the age of information overload in the digital landscape, it’s unclear if “completing” a search is even possible. Remind yourself what you set out to initially accomplish with your search and start by reviewing one resource. If you’re unsure or feeling stuck, please reach out to a research librarian or your professor. They are here to help you!

 

 

December 2023 New Materials

The image shows a collage of eight book covers from the December 2023 New Materials list at Zief Law Library.
Collage of book covers from the December 2023 New Materials list at Zief Law Library.

Happy New Year, law school community! Don’t miss out on the new materials added to the Zief Law Library collection in December 2023. Topics from December include: constitutional law, emigration and immigration law, health law, and law study guidance. Click the titles below or explore our monthly New Materials at Zief Law Library webpage for the complete list of recent arrivals. 

November 2023 New Materials

The image shows a collage of eight book covers from the November 2023 New Materials list at Zief Law Library.
Collage of book covers from the November 2023 New Materials list at Zief Law Library.

The Zief Law Library added new materials to its collection in November 2023. Topics from November include: administrative law, animal law, capital punishment, criminal law, data protection and privacy, immigration law, evidence, and legal accounting. Click the titles below or explore our monthly New Materials at Zief Law Library webpage for the complete list of recent arrivals. 

New Materials: October 2023

The newest addition to the Zief Law Library collection, Paul T Jaeger’s “Foundations of Information Law” (2023).

The Zief Law Library added one new title to its collection in October 2023. Click the title below or explore our monthly New Materials at Zief Law Library webpage for the complete list of recent arrivals.

New Materials: September 2023

The collage above shows eight book covers from the list of new library materials.

The Zief Law Library added new materials to its collection in September 2023. Topics from September include: capital punishment; constitutional law; contracts; criminal procedure; estate planning; evidence; technology and the law; and trial practice. Click the titles below or explore our monthly New Materials at Zief Law Library webpage for the complete list of recent arrivals. 

Zief’s New Career Services Collection

Zief’s New Career Services Collection

What is the Career Services Collection?

Grey notebook with "Let's Get Started" printed in small font. This summer, in collaboration with the Office of Career Services, Zief Research Librarians curated a collection of materials and resources to best help you prepare for your legal careers. From landing a job interview to navigating your first workplace conflict, the Career Services Collection can be a source of advice for your future legal professional journey.

Where is it located?

The print materials are currently available on the first floor of Zief Law Library, near the research librarians’ offices.

Newest additions

Here are some of the newest titles added to the Career Services Collection:

  1. Roadmap: the law student’s guide to meaningful employment by Neil W. Hamilton
  2. The introverted lawyer: a seven-step journey toward authentically empowered advocacy by Heidi K. Brown
  3. The all-inclusive guide to judicial clerking by Abigail L. Perdue
  4. Big law confidential: the comprehensive guide to the large law firm work experience in the U.S. by D.W. Randolph

Office of Career Services

For individual career counseling, speak to the Office of Career Services, located in Kendrick 335 and 336.

For help finding resources on a specific area of legal practice, talk to your Zief Research Librarians.

 

 

New Materials: May, June, and July 2023

The image above is a collage of eight book covers: How To Write Law Essays and Exams by S.I. Strong; Advanced Introduction To Mental Health Law by Michael L. Perlin; The Guide To Belonging In Law School by Russell A. Mcclain; In The Shadow of Death: Restorative Justice and Death Row Families by Elizabeth Beck, Sarah Britto, and Arlene Andrews; Roadmap: The Law Student’s Guide To Meaningful Employment by Neil W. Hamilton; The Introverted Lawyer: A Seven-Step Journey Towards Authentically Empowered Advocacy by Heidi Brown; The All-Inclusive Guide To Judicial Clerking by Abigail L. Perdue; Atlas of AI: Power, Politics, and The Planetary Costs of Artificial Intelligence by Kate Crawford.
The image above shows eight selected titles from the summer 2023 new materials list.

Welcome back, law students! The Zief Law Library added new materials to its collection over the summer. Topics from May, June, and July include: legal research; business and economics; technology; cybersecurity; civil procedure; legal ethics; freedom of speech; human rights; mental health law; women and the law; environmental law; housing and gentrification; privacy law, sports law, elections and United States politics; capital punishment; career planning and vocational guidance; law clerking; and bar exam preparation. Click the titles below or explore our monthly New Materials at Zief Law Library webpage for the complete list of recent arrivals.

 

New Library Materials, April 2023

Book Covers From The Zief Library Catalog

The Zief Law Library added new materials to its collection in April 2023! Check out these three new titles, with topics including career planning, law practice, race discrimination, and business law. Explore our monthly New Materials at Zief Law Library webpage for the full list of recent arrivals. Stay tuned for more new materials this summer. 

Summer Access to Lexis, Westlaw, and Bloomberg

Hi all! Summer is upon us, and you’re probably gearing up to tackle your summer internship placements. As an important reminder, there are certain limitations on using certain research platforms over the summer. Here, we’ll take a look at the big three  – Westlaw, Lexis, and Bloomberg – and run through what you’ll be able to use them for. And don’t forget, your librarians are also here to help support you throughout the summer

Westlaw

Westlaw can be used over the summer for non-commercial research — you can’t use it in situations where you are billing a client. Examples of permissible use include: Continue reading “Summer Access to Lexis, Westlaw, and Bloomberg”

Beyond Lexis & Westlaw: CEB

In our continuing series introducing you to legal research databases that we recommend you try, this month we’re taking a look at the CEB legal research platform and highlighting some of its unique features. CEB – short for Continuing Eduation of the Bar – provides valuable research resources for California law students and attorneys.

What is CEB?

Founded in 1947 as a nonprofit program of the University of California to educate veterans returning to legal practice after serving in World War II, CEB today offers access to a range of materials, including: primary sources; practice guides; practitioner materials; daily news alerts; and continuing legal education (CLE) materials for practicing California attorneys.

CEB Logo

How is CEB Different from Westlaw and Lexis?

Unlike Lexis and Westlaw, CEB is designed specifically to help the California legal community and therefore focuses on California law. It includes cases (California Court of Appeals and Supreme Court, Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, and U.S. Supreme Court), statutes, and California Rules of Court. It also includes a large collection of California practice guides and other practitioner materials, as well as legal news and continuing education materials for California attorneys. These resources can also help you as a student in your clinical, internship, or externship experiences.

These are the CEB features and tools worth exploring:

  • Advanced Search Filters for Case Law Searches: CEB allows you to narrow your case law search results using advanced filters. For example, you can narrow your results by specific cause of action (e.g., harassment, fraud, discrimination), procedural posture (e.g., demurrer, motion for summary judgment, motion for change of venue), and disposition (e.g., reverse, affirm, grant). These filters allow you to find cases analogous to your own, and not just those with similar search terms.
  • Secondary Sources: CEB includes about 180 unique, searchable practice guides written by and for California lawyers, covering California law on 20 broad topics. Each practice guide also includes these helpful finding aids: table of contents, table of statutes, table of cases, and an index.
  • Practitioner Materials: CEB provides helpful practitioner materials including workflow charts, how-to guides, strategy notes, charts and checklists, and standard documents with referenced authorities. They cover the following six legal topics (each divided into subtopics): Business Entities, Business Litigation, Employment Law, Litigation Practice & Procedure, Real Property, and Trusts & Estates.
  • Daily News: CEB provides California legal news updates in 31 practice areas to help you stay up-to-date with daily law alerts and articles on the latest developments in your research or practice area.

How can I access CEB as a Student?

CEB is accessible to current USF law students and faculty in two ways:

CEB’s OnLaw Logo
  • Via its classic interface CEB OnLaw, which does not require registration (from off campus or on campus); or

 

 

 

CEB OnLawPro Logo
  • Via registration for its updated interface, CEB Pro. Please contact one of your Zief librarians for CEB Pro registration information. If you have already registered, visit research.ceb.com to sign in. Students who sign up for CEB Pro before they graduate will continue to have free access for 18 months after they graduate. For more information about how you can incorporate CEB’s resources into your research, stop by Zief and chat with your research librarians.

“Research Tips from an Old School Librarian” — the Restatements

Many law students think of the Restatements of the Law as nothing more than the brief excerpts included in their case books. This week, in his special column, “Research Tips from an Old School Librarian,” research librarian John Shafer will show you why you may want to dig deeper into the Restatements.

What are the Restatements?

The Restatements of Law, published by the American Law Institute (ALI), are a valuable resource for law students, legal professionals, and scholars alike. These authoritative and influential legal treatises aim to clarify, simplify, and modernize various areas of common law in the United States.

By distilling and restating the general principles and rules derived from case law, statutes, and legal scholarship, the Restatements provide a clear and comprehensive summary of the current state of the law. They serve as a reference for judges, lawyers, scholars, and legislators, guiding courts in areas where the law may be ambiguous or inconsistent. Although not legally binding, the Restatements often act as persuasive authority in judicial decision-making, shaping the development and evolution of the law.

The Restatements, along with their accompanying examples, illustrations, and annotations, are invaluable tools for law professors and students. Professors often draw from the examples and illustrations to create the hypotheticals they use in lectures and examinations, designing engaging and challenging problems that test students’ comprehension of legal concepts and principles. You, as a student, on the other hand, can employ these examples and illustrations to prepare for exams, enhance readiness for being called on in class, and deepen your understanding of the Restatements.

The annotations that accompany the Restatements are also helpful for locating case law that cites specific Restatement sections. By examining these annotations, you can identify relevant legal authority to support your arguments and enrich your research, as well as observe the practical impacts the Restatements have on the development and evolution of the law.

Accessing the Restatements:

In Print: The Zief Law Library has a fairly complete collection of the Restatements in print. They are located behind the Circulation and Reserve Desk and can be checked out for use in the library. The Ignacio library catalog shows a list of our current Restatement holdings:

Online: The full text of the Restatements is not freely available on the internet due to copyright restrictions. However, you can access the complete Restatements through legal research platforms, such as Westlaw, LexisNexis, HeinOnline, and Bloomberg Law (BL has a subset of all the Restatements available). Links to each of those services appear below — you will need to use your personal academic password or identify yourself as a USF Law student in order to use them:

In conclusion, the Restatements of Law are a valuable resource for law students seeking to strengthen their understanding of common law principles. By examining the Restatements and their accompanying examples, illustrations, and annotations, you can develop problem-solving skills, boost your confidence in class, excel in exams, and better prepare for your future legal career.